Catherine Price

NEW EXCLUSIVE
  • Author of How to Break Up With Your Phone
  • Award-Winning Journalist
  • Time Management Expert
  • Founder of ScreenLifeBalance.com

Hailed in The New York Times as "the Marie Kondo of brains," Catherine Price is an award-winning science journalist, speaker, and author ofHow to Break Up With Your Phone: The 30-Day Plan to Take Back Your Life(Ten Speed Press, 2018). As a consultant, coach and workshop leader, she helps individuals and organizations create healthier personal and professional relationships with their phones (and other devices), and establish best practices to encourage creativity, productivity and mental health.  

A “new and noteworthy” selection by the New York Times, How to Break Up With Your Phone is being published in 29 countries, and has been featured in scores of high-profile media outlets around the world, including NPR, The New York Times, The New York Times Magazine, The Los Angeles Times, Time Magazine, Wired, Vox, Refinery29, BBC World News Service, and many others. A New York Times article about Catherine and her 30-day program titled " Do Not Disturb: How I Ditched My Phone and Unbroke My Brain ,” went viral, receiving more than 2 million hits in less than a week. The article remained at the #1 slot for most-popular, most-emailed and most-shared for more than four days, and was the #27 most-read article published by the New York Times in all of 2019.

Catherine is also the creator and founder of Screen/Life Balance (a term that she coined) which is dedicated to helping people learn how to scroll less and live more. Screen/Life Balance is part of Catherine’s continued mission to create evidence-backed resources to help people around the world design lives in which they control their technology, rather than the other way around—with the ultimate  goal of increasing happiness, productivity, creativity, health and wellbeing. 

Catherine speaks, consults, and leads workshops on how individuals and corporations can set better boundaries with — and best practices for — their devices in order to maximize creativity and productivity, and improve mental health. Her engagements can be customized based on audience size and area of interest, but they are always compelling and actionable, chock-full of with what Catherine calls "science-backed self help," to reveals how to monitor our technology use, prevent burnout, and improve brain function and performance. 

 

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Rave Reviews About Catherine Price
A very enlightening and thought-provoking discussion that may even prove to be life-changing.

A Sample of the Groups That Have Hosted Catherine Price
  • SXSW
  • The Pennsylvania Conference for Women
  • Rancho La Puerta
  • Miraval
  • Warburg Pincus
  • ISC(2)
  • TNW (The Next Web)
  • World Science Festival
  • Free Library of Philadelphia
  • T. Rowe Price
Keynote - Screen Life Balance | The Next Web [23:28] - Get Sharable Link
Explore Catherine Price's Talks
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How To Break Up With Your Phone

Is your phone the first thing you reach for in the morning and the last thing you touch before bed? Do you frequently pick it up “just to check,” only to look up 45 minutes later wondering where the time has gone? Do you say you want to spend less time on your phone—but have no idea how to do so wit ...

Is your phone the first thing you reach for in the morning and the last thing you touch before bed? Do you frequently pick it up “just to check,” only to look up 45 minutes later wondering where the time has gone? Do you say you want to spend less time on your phone—but have no idea how to do so without giving it up completely? Research shows that the time we spend on our smartphones is changing our brains in ways that interfere with our sleep, self-esteem, relationships, memory, attention spans, creativity, productivity and problem-solving and decision-making skills. This has negative effects on both our personal and professional lives. In this talk, based on her book, How to Break Up With Your Phone, Catherine reveals the way in which our phones and devices are designed to addict us. She explains how the time we spend on our phones is affecting our creativity, productivity, and relationships, physical and mental health. She then provides practical, hands-on solutions and strategies to help break the addictive cycle and establish a healthy relationship with your phone. This talk—which can also be presented as a hands-on workshop— is relevant for a wide range of audiences and events, including business leaders, corporate events, education nights, students, and wellness experts. Note: Catherine is not “anti-tech.” The goal of the talk is to help people keep what they love about their phones and get rid of or minimize what they don’t.

Screen/Life Balance is the New Work/Life Balance

If you add up the hours you spend each day interacting with your phone, tablet, laptop, desktop or television, you may realize that you’re spending the majority of your waking life staring at a screen. Sure, much of this screen time is essential, even enjoyable. But there are a lot of other times wh ...

If you add up the hours you spend each day interacting with your phone, tablet, laptop, desktop or television, you may realize that you’re spending the majority of your waking life staring at a screen. Sure, much of this screen time is essential, even enjoyable. But there are a lot of other times when our screens reduce our productivity and distract us from things that are truly important to us—whether it’s our work, the people we love, or the activities that bring us meaning and joy. In this talk, suitable for a broad range of audiences, Catherine explains the concept of Screen/Life Balance a term that she coined to refer to the practice of creating a healthy, productive, happy balance between on-screen and off-screen life. She reveals why Screen/Life Balance is essential for our productivity, creativity, careers, relationships, happiness and long-term physical and mental health. She then gives customized suggestions for how to help the audience figure out—and achieve—a personalized and professional Screen/Life Balance.

“Vitamania”: The Strange and Surprising Story of Nutrition’s Most Powerful Word

Everyone is familiar with vitamins – many of us have taken them since we were children, after all, and marketers often use the presence of vitamins as proof of the nutritional quality of their products. But what, exactly, is a vitamin? Where did the word come from? Does the presence of vitamins mean ...

Everyone is familiar with vitamins – many of us have taken them since we were children, after all, and marketers often use the presence of vitamins as proof of the nutritional quality of their products. But what, exactly, is a vitamin? Where did the word come from? Does the presence of vitamins mean that something is healthy? And how has the word’s popularity affected our overall approach toward food? In this talk, which is suitable both for the public and for nutrition- and health-related professional conferences and educational settings, Price argues that, as both individuals and a society, we’ve been seduced by a word. She reveals the fascinating history of the word “vitamin,” including its surprisingly recent coinage (it was made up in 1911 by a Polish biochemist named Casimir Funk), its early use by food marketers, and the many ways it is used to manipulate our buying choices today. Along the way, she demonstrates how we’ve come to associate vitamins with near magical powers, and how, despite having no precise scientific definition, the word “vitamin” laid the foundations for our current detail-obsessed philosophy toward nutrition. She also reveals how “vitamin” has been brilliantly used by marketers and the supplement industry to come to stand in for the much larger category of dietary supplements – leading to a regulatory situation that both threatens the public’s health and defies common sense.

How to Talk So Your Patients Will Listen and Listen So Your Patients Will Talk

Medical professionals who deal with diabetes – whether they’re primary care doctors, endocrinologists, nutritionists, dieticians or certified diabetes educators – are all devoted to improving the lives of their patients. And yet there is often a profound disconnect between caregivers and their patie ...

Medical professionals who deal with diabetes – whether they’re primary care doctors, endocrinologists, nutritionists, dieticians or certified diabetes educators – are all devoted to improving the lives of their patients. And yet there is often a profound disconnect between caregivers and their patients, with the caregiver feeling as if the patient is ignoring his or her advice, and the patient feeling discouraged, frustrated and ashamed. In this talk, Catherine calls upon her background as a science journalist and her experience living with Type 1 diabetes (with which she was diagnosed in 2001) to explore why this happens—and how it can be stopped

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<p>Speaker Spotlight: Catherine Price</p>

Speaker Spotlight: Catherine Price

Hailed in The New York Times as "the Marie Kondo of brains," CATHERINE PRICE is an award-winning science journalist, speaker, and author of How to Break Up With Your Phone: The 30-Day Plan to Take Back Your Life (Ten Speed Press, 2018). As a consultant, coach, speaker, and workshop leader, she helps individuals and organizations create healthier personal and professional relationships with their phones (and other devices), and establish best practices to encourage creativity, productivity and mental health. A “new and noteworthy” selection by the New York Times, Catherine's book How to Break Up With Your Phone has been featured in scores of high-profile media outlets around the world, including NPR, The New York Times, The New York Times Magazine, The Los Angeles Times, Time Magazine, Wired, Vox, BBC World News Service, and many others. A New York Times article about Catherine and her 30-day program titled " Do Not Disturb: How I Ditched My Phone and Unbroke My Brain ,” went viral, receiving more than 2 million hits in less than a week, and going on to become one of the New York Times' most-read article in all of 2019. Catherine is also the creator and founder of Screen/Life Balance (a term that she coined) which is dedicated to helping people learn how to scroll less and live more. 

At engagements, Catherine helps individuals and corporations set better boundaries with — and best practices for — their devices in order to maximize happiness, productivity, creativity, health and wellbeing. Her remarks and format can be customized based on audience size and area of interest, but they are always compelling and actionable, and chock-full of with what Catherine calls "science-backed self help" and evidence-backed resources to help people around the world design lives in which they control their technology, rather than the other way around. Sought out to speak everywhere from SXSW to Fortune, Catherine receives out-of-this-world reviews, such as: "A very enlightening and thought-provoking discussion that may even prove to be life-changing." (San Francisco Giants); "Catherine’s talk has been one of the most well received we’ve ever had. Not only is she an engaging speaker, but she’s insightful, and will have you thinking about the concepts she touches on for months..." (Livongo Health)

Books by Catherine Price
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Biography

“Catherine Price [is] the Marie Kondo of brains.”—Kevin Roose, The New York Times

“In How to Break up with Your Phone , Catherine Price has written the essential guide for taking control of our lives. . . . Price has established herself as one of the leading writers and speakers on this vital conversation.” —Arianna Huffington

Catherine Price is an award-winning science journalist, speaker, and author of How to Break Up With Your Phone: The 30-Day Plan to Take Back Your Life (Ten Speed Press, 2018). As a consultant, coach and workshop leader, she helps individuals and organizations create healthier personal and professional relationships with their phones (and other devices), and establish best practices to encourage creativity, productivity and mental health.

In February 2019, an article was published in the New York Times about Catherine and her 30-day program. Titled " Do Not Disturb: How I Ditched My Phone and Unbroke My Brain ,” the article went viral, receiving more than 2 million hits in less than a week; remained at the #1 slot for most-popular, most-emailed and most-shared for more than four days; and was the #27 most-read article published by the New York Times in all of 2019.

A “new and noteworthy” selection by the New York Times, How to Break Up With Your Phone is being published in 29 countries, and has been featured in scores of high-profile media outlets around the world, including NPR, The New York Times, The New York Times Magazine, The Los Angeles Times, Time Magazine, Wired, Vox, Refinery29, BBC World News Service, Recode, 10% Happier, Costco Connection, The Daily Mail, The Telegraph, Rachael Ray, Dr. Oz, Good Morning America, and CBS This Morning, among many others.

Her journalistic work has appeared in publications including The Best American Science Writing, The New York Times, Popular Science, O, The Oprah Magazine, The Los Angeles Times, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Washington Post Magazine, Parade, Salon, Slate, Men’s Journal, Self, Medium, Health Magazine, and Outside, among many others. 

Her previous books include VITAMANIA: How Vitamins Revolutionized the Way We Think About Food (Penguin Press, 2015), Mindfulness: A Journal (Clarkson Potter, 2016), the parody travel guide 101 Places Not to See Before You Die (HarperPaperbacks, 2010) and The Big Sur Bakery Cookbook (HarperCollins, 2009). 

Catherine is also the creator and founder of Screen/Life Balance (a term that she coined) which is dedicated to helping people learn how to scroll less and live more. Screen/Life Balance is part of Catherine’s continued mission to create evidence-backed resources to help people around the world design lives in which they control their technology, rather than the other way around—with the ultimate  goal of increasing happiness, productivity, creativity, health and wellbeing. 

A graduate of Yale University and the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, Catherine also speaks, consults and writes about nutrition-related subjects, as well as Type 1 diabetes, with which she was diagnosed in 2001. She lives in Philadelphia.