Ed Balls

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  • UK Shadow Chancellor and Chief Economic Advisor to the UK Treasury (2010-2015)
  • Economic Secretary to the UK Treasury (2006-2007)
  • Former Chair, International Monetary and Financial Committee Deputies
  • Leading Global Economist & Expert on Monetary Policy and Eurozone Issues

Former UK Shadow Chancellor, Cabinet Minister and Chief Economic Adviser to the UK Treasury, Ed Balls has over twenty years of experience at the nexus of international finance, economic policy-making, business and politics. He is currently a Senior Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School and a Senior Visiting Fellow at the London School of Economics.

On the international stage, he was the chair of the IMFC deputies committee, for which he traveled extensively to both developed economies and emerging markets. He has regularly represented the UK at Finance Minister level meetings of both the G20 and the European Council. He has served as a minister and cabinet minister in the governments of both Tony Blair and Gordon Brown. 

 
  

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Ed was terrific! Informed, entertaining, challenging, interesting .. He is a brilliant speaker, and we hope to engage him in the future.

A Sample of the Groups That Have Hosted Ed Balls
  • The Institute of International Finance
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The Future of Britain, Post Brexit

Following the historic vote, Britain is leaving the European Union. Given that the UK is the US biggest European trading partner, what are the implications for UK politics, Europe and US and global business? ...

Following the historic vote, Britain is leaving the European Union. Given that the UK is the US biggest European trading partner, what are the implications for UK politics, Europe and US and global business?

Opportunities and Risks in the Global Economy

The world economy continues to recover slowly and fitfully from the global financial crisis. The Euro-zone crisis remains unresolved. China is slowing. Emerging markets remain vulnerable to economic shocks. And central banks have been cautious about raising rates. Are we locked into an extended peri ...

The world economy continues to recover slowly and fitfully from the global financial crisis. The Euro-zone crisis remains unresolved. China is slowing. Emerging markets remain vulnerable to economic shocks. And central banks have been cautious about raising rates. Are we locked into an extended period of slow and fragile growth? Will economies cope with a steady and cautious rise in interest rates? Or are the seeds of the next bout of instability already being sown?  

Why We Must Deliver Inclusive Prosperity

Wage growth has been stagnant for over a decade in America, Britain and across many parts of the developed world as inequality has continued to grow. And the result has been growing anti-politics and anti-business sentiment and the rise of extreme parties on both the far-right and far-left peddling ...

Wage growth has been stagnant for over a decade in America, Britain and across many parts of the developed world as inequality has continued to grow. And the result has been growing anti-politics and anti-business sentiment and the rise of extreme parties on both the far-right and far-left peddling populist and anti-trade solutions. What are the drivers of this wage stagnation? Can we build a more inclusive prosperity for the future? And what are the consequences for government and business if we fail?  

Politics, Business and Public Opinion in the 21st Century

The rapid globalization of our economies and politics, and the digital-age rise of social media alongside the decline of traditional news media, have transformed the environment in which business and political decisions are made. The pace of change is much faster and reputations, painstakingly built ...

The rapid globalization of our economies and politics, and the digital-age rise of social media alongside the decline of traditional news media, have transformed the environment in which business and political decisions are made. The pace of change is much faster and reputations, painstakingly built over years, can be lost much more quickly than ever before. What can lessons can politics and business teach each other about how to navigate this new and fast-paced 21st century world — and how do we capture the benefits?  

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<p>What does ">

What does "America First" mean for TRADE and TAX POLICY?  These HWA speakers know the decisions facing CEOs and Congress, and the impact on American workers, our foreign policy and the economy as a whole.  These speakers are compelling keynote speakers and also fiery debaters on a panel.

Steve Forbes: CEO of Forbes media, champion of tax reform and former U.S. Presidential candidate

Max Baucus: Trade expert, Ambassador to China (2014 - 2017) & Chair of Senate Finance Committee (2007 - 2014)

Lawrence Summers: Secretary of the Treasury and Director White House Council of Economic Advisors

Alan Krueger: Jobs expert, Chairman White House Council of Economic Advisors, Chief Economist of the U.S. Treasury

Julia Gillard: Prime Minister of Australia (2010- 2013) and expert on trade in the Asian-Pacific region

Ed Balls: Chief Economic Advisor to the UK Treasury (2010 - 2015) 

Paul Tucker: Deputy Governor of the Bank of England (2009 - 2013)

Felipe Calderon: President of Mexico (2006 - 2012) and NAFTA expert

Vicente Fox: President of Mexico (200 - 2006) and NAFTA expert

More experts on taxes and trade issues in North America, Europe and Asia >>
<p>Ed Balls speaks out in new book</p>

Ed Balls speaks out in new book

Ed Balls, Former British MP, Cabinet Minister and Treasury Chief Economic Advisor, has written a record of his life in politics, and more.  This new release is about how power can be used for the benefit of others, and the lessons that can be learned when things go wrong. It is about the mechanics of Westminster, and of Government. It is about facing up to your fears and misgivings, and tackling your limitations – on stages both public and private.

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<p>Ed Balls deconstructs Brexit as ">

Ed Balls deconstructs Brexit as "A Remainer's Lament"

"A longtime member of the United Kingdom’s Labour party, Ed Balls was elected to parliament in 2005 and served as shadow chancellor of the exchequer from 2011 to 2015. Before that, he was chief economic adviser to the Treasury and a columnist at The Financial Times. Now a senior fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School, Balls, who supported the Remain campaign, spoke with Foreign Affairs."

Read the article in Foreign Affairs >>
<p>A tour through Ed Balls' website offers a glimpse of what audiences get when he arrives to their events: Serious and thought-provoking political discussion about important Euro-zone and Brexit issues, disarming candor and a ton of fun</p>

A tour through Ed Balls' website offers a glimpse of what audiences get when he arrives to their events: Serious and thought-provoking political discussion about important Euro-zone and Brexit issues, disarming candor and a ton of fun

For example, this is how Ed Balls describes himself: Senior Fellow at Harvard Kennedy School, Visiting Professor to the Policy Institute at King’s College London, Norwich City FC Chairman and contestant on Strictly Come Dancing.
Dad, cook, pianist, economist. Former Cabinet Minister & Shadow Chancellor.

Visit Ed Balls' website >>
<p>Ed Balls is a contestant on BBC One's wildly popular dancing contest with 12 million viewers</p>

Ed Balls is a contestant on BBC One's wildly popular dancing contest with 12 million viewers

"I’d like to say I’m just really excited about learning to dance on TV, but the truth is I’m also scared to death. Making a speech in Parliament seems a piece of cake compared to this, but hopefully I can stick around for a couple of weeks, and have a lot of fun in the process."

Read more about Ed Balls turn on Strictly >>
<p>Ed Balls was Chief Economic Advisor to the Treasury in the UK</p>

Ed Balls was Chief Economic Advisor to the Treasury in the UK

As former Chief Economic Adviser to the Treasury, Ed Balls is extremely qualified to speak on the UK economy's interaction with the European Union.  Ed led the design of policies including independence of the Bank of England, the New Deal jobs program, and the Five Tests Euro that assessed Britain's readiness to join the European Union.

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<p>Echoes of the 1930s Must Focus Finance Ministers' Minds</p>

Echoes of the 1930s Must Focus Finance Ministers' Minds

Ed Balls, former Chief Economic Advisor to UK Treasury, advises G20 Finance Ministers to focus on risks to the global economy, and "get their act together."

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<p>British Influence and Prosperity Depend on Staying in the EU </p>

British Influence and Prosperity Depend on Staying in the EU 

Britain will make a momentous decision to stay in the European Union or leave and go it alone. Leading Global Economist & Expert on Monetary Policy and Eurozone Issues ED BALLS writes in this WSJ piece that, "The outcome will have a long and lasting impact, on the jobs and living standards of British citizens, on the fortunes of many global companies, and on the U.K.’s influence across the world."

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<p>Ed Balls' Latest Financial Times Op-Ed</p>

Ed Balls' Latest Financial Times Op-Ed

Ed Balls talks about the financial crisis "that never was."

Read article...
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Biography

Ed Balls is Senior Fellow at Harvard University Kennedy School's Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government and Visiting Professor to the Policy Institute at King’s College London.

He was UK Shadow Chancellor from 2011 to 2015 and co-chaired the American Progress Inclusive Prosperity Commission with former US Treasury Secretary, Larry Summers, which reported in January 2015.  He served as a member of the Prime Minister’s Holocaust Commission and is now a member of the Holocaust Memorial Foundation Board.  

He served in the British Cabinet as Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families (2007-2010). He was previously the UK Economic Secretary and Minister for Financial Services (2006-2007) and the Chief Economic Adviser to the UK Treasury (1997-2004), during which time he was the Chair of the International Monetary Fund Deputies and UK G20 Deputy.

Ed was the Labour & Co-operative Member of Parliament for Morley and Outwood (2010-2015) and MP for Normanton (2005-2010).

As Chief Economic Adviser to the Treasury (1997-2004), Ed led the design of policies including independence of the Bank of England, the New Deal jobs program, the Five Tests Euro assessment, Sure Start, tax credits and the national minimum wage.

As a Treasury Minister, he was commissioned by the G7 Finance Ministers in 2006 to prepare a report with Sir Jon Cunliffe (now deputy Governor of the Bank of England) on Economic Aspects of the Israel-Palestine conflict.

At the Department for Children, Schools and Families, Ed brought together schools and children's policy for the first time in the Children's Plan and led policies to raise the UK education and training leaving age to 18, establish the independent Office for Qualifications and Examination Regulation (Ofqual), reform the Academies program, establish the National Challenge initiative to turn around under-performing schools, reform the social work profession and transform services and short breaks for disabled children and their families.

As Shadow Chancellor, Ed was awarded the Spectator Parliamentarian of the Year in 2011 and the Political Studies Association Politician of the Year, 2011

Born in Norwich in 1967, his family moved to Nottingham when Ed was 8. He attended Crossdale Drive primary school and then Nottingham High School. Ed went on to study economics and philosophy at Keble College, Oxford, and economics and politics (MPA) at the John F Kennedy School of Government, Harvard, where he was a Kennedy Scholar.

Ed was a teaching fellow in the Department of Economics, Harvard University (1989-90) and co-author with Professors Lawrence Summers and Lawrence Katz on labour economics. He was Economics leader writer and columnist at the Financial Times (1990-94) where he was the WINCOTT Young Financial Journalist of the Year. He has also written regularly for the Guardian, New Statesman and Tribune and co-authored a number of books, papers, articles and pamphlets.

Ed is married to Yvette Cooper MP, the Shadow Home Secretary. They have three children and live in London and Castleford. His interests include learning the piano, marathon running, cooking and supporting Norwich City. He is a member of the Privy Council and an Honorary Fellow of Keble College, Oxford.